Learn to Make a Pendant from Clay

by Iris Rodriguez

Learn to Make a Pendant from Clay

Making your own jewelry can be so rewarding. You get to make fun and exciting creations, express yourself and make a statement. Making beads out of polymer clay is a great way to get started or simply experiment and see if you like it. The beads can be stamped, colored, and even embossed. For this project, I made a round, dome-shaped bead, stamped it and embossed with silver embossing powder.

Skill: Intermediate
Time: 30 minutes + baking time according to clay manufacturer instructions

Directions


Step 1

Set out your mat. Ceramic, glass or special mats like Polyform’s Sculpey Make ‘N Bake Mat surfaces work best when working with clay.


Step 2

Begin by conditioning the clay with a clay roller, or pasta machine. When first taking the clay out of the package, roll the clay a few times in order to soften it. If it cracks when running it through the pasta machine or roller; this means that it’s not conditioned. So continue to condition. If using a pasta machine, roll one sheet of clay to the third thickest setting. If using a roller, aim for 1/16 inch thickness. Place stamp over the clay, press firmly into the clay with your fingers or clay roller.


Step 3

Remove stamp. Ensure you get a deep indentation so that you have good dimension.


Step 4

Using the Premo Sculpey Circle cutters, cut out the clay. Use the second largest cutter from the set.


Step 5

Prepare the pendant for baking. In order to get a dome shape, place the clay over a rounded object, like a burned out light bulb or the round edge of a ceramic bowl. Bake the clay according to the manufacturer’s instructions on the package.


Step 6

While the clay is baking, prepare the bail. Using the Premo Sculpey Circle cutters, cut out a circle. Use the second smallest cutter from the set. Then use the smallest cutter and cut out tiny slices off on opposite sides of each other.


Step 7

After the clay cures, roll out a small sheet of clay to the 4th thickest setting in the pasta machine. Spread a little bit of liquid clay on the back of the bead. The liquid clay adheres the clay to each other. Adhere the newly rolled out sheet of clay. Cut out the excess with a precision knife. Texture the back. This is in case, the bead flips while you are wearing it and it will still look fabulous. Add a couple of drops of liquid clay to the bail and adhere to the bead. Before doing so, lay down a piece of wire, so that it bakes with an opening. This is where the cord will go through. Bake the bead according to the manufacturer’s instructions on the package.


Step 8

Ink the raised areas with the VersaMark ink. Add embossing powder in Silver. The clay tends to attract the embossing powder so it will want to go into the non-inked area. Use a liner brush to remove the embossing powder from the crevices.


Step 9

Heat set the embossing powder, just like you would on paper. The clay will tend to get a little soft with the heat. Let cool off, do not touch and risk distorting it. The clay will harden again. Seal the bead with Sculpey Gloss Glaze. It is very important to seal the clay. It protects the embossing powder and clay. Add the leather or cotton cord and clasp. Now you have a necklace to add to your wardrobe.

Supplies

Imagine
Other
  • Polyform – Sculpey Souffle Clay in Poppy Seed, Gloss Glaze, Graduated Cutter Circle Set
  • Lightbulb
  • Rubber Stamp
  • Leather or Cotton Cord
  • Jewelry Hardware: jump ring, clasp, needle nose pliers
  • Ceramic tile, crafting glass, or Sculpey Work ‘N Bake Clay Mat

Learn How To Make Three Unique Bowls

by Iris Rodriguez

Learn How To Make Three Unique Bowls

Ink is not just for paper. You can use it on fabric, metal and more specifically Polyform clay. You can use inks to transform polymer clay projects into a wide variety of pieces. Use ink to simply color your clays projects, use with stamps to add designs, or blend it into the clay to create a new color clay. For this project, I create three different bowls using Sculpey Souffle clay with VesaMagic Dew Drop and StazOn inks and demonstrate several techniques when using inks. Hope I pique your interest and give these projects a try.

Skill: Advanced
Time: 1 hour per bowl; baking time according to clay manufacturer instructions

Directions

Making the Round Yellow and Purple Bowl


Step 1

Ceramic, glass or specially made mat like Polyform’s Sculpey Make ‘n Bake Mat surfaces work best when working with clay.


Step 2

Before starting, determine bowl size. Use a template or a real bowl as a guide. This will help to determine how much clay you will need. For this bowl, use the Canary Sculpey Souffle clay.
Begin by conditioning the clay with a clay roller, or pasta machine. When first taking the clay out of the package, roll the clay a few times in order to soften it. If it cracks when running it through the pasta machine or roller; this means that it’s not conditioned. So continue to condition. If using a pasta machine, roll out two sheets of clay to the third thickest setting. If using a roller, aim for ~¼ inch thickness. Ensure that the sheet is big enough for desired bowl size. Place one sheet over the other sheet, roll the clay roller over the sheets; this allows them to stick together and avoids bubbles.


Step 3

Place a long string in a random fashion on top of the clay.


Step 4

Squish the string with an acrylic block or tile. Avoid using your fingers to push in the string, as you’ll get fingerprints and finger indentations on the clay.


Step 5

Pounce the Purple Hydrangea VersaMagic Dew Drop ink.


Step 6

Remove the string.


Step 7

Place a bowl or template over the clay, cut the excess clay.


Step 8

Smooth out the outer edge (or what will be the bowl’s rim) with your fingers or clay tool. Color the outer edge with the Purple Hydrangea VersaMagic Dew Drop ink.


Step 9

Place the clay bowl into a real bowl and bake according to the manufacturer’s instructions on the package. The clay bowl will take on the shape of the real bowl.


Step 10

Seal the clay bowl with Polyform Sculpey Gloss Glaze.


Making the Square Teal and Red Bowl


Step 1

Following the same instructions in Step 2 above. Determine bowl size. For this bowl blend 2/3 Sea Glass Sculpey Souffle clay and 1/3 Igloo Sculpey Souffle, to lighten it up a little. Roll out one sheet to the third thickest setting or ~1/16 inch if using a clay roller.


Step 2

Ink a large background stamp or clay texture stamp with Claret StazOn ink.


Step 3

Stamp into the clay. Press firmly with your fingers. Cut out holes with a cutter or use the cap of a pen.


Step 4

Following the same instructions in Step 2. Roll out one sheet of the Cherry Pie Sculpey Souffle clay to the third thickest setting or ~1/16 inch if using a clay roller. Place the Cherry Pie clay sheet under the Sea Glass sheet. Roll the clay roller over the sheets; this allows them to stick together and avoids bubbles.


Step 5

Cut the excess clay. Place the clay bowl into a real bowl and bake according to the manufacturer’s instructions on the package. The clay bowl will take on the shape of the real bowl.


Making the Oval Blue and Green Bowl


Step 1

Following the same instructions in Step 2. For this bowl use the Igloo Sculpey Souffle clay. Roll out two sheets to the third thickest setting or ~1/4 inch if using a clay roller. Place one sheet over the other sheet, roll the clay roller over the sheets; this allows them to stick together and avoids bubbles. Pounce on the Spanish Olive and Aegean Blue VersaMagic DewDrop inks onto a rubber stamp.


Step 2

Stamp into the clay. Press firmly with your fingers.


Step 3

Add interest to the edges with some markings. For this bowl, I inked a wooden clay tool with the Aegean Blue VersaMagic Dew Drop ink and pressed it onto the edges.


Step 4

For this bowl, I wanted a sort of uneven edges. I placed the clay bowl in a real bowl and lined the sides with aluminum foil, giving it ruffled like shape. Bake according to the manufacturer’s instructions on the package. The clay bowl will take on the shape of the real bowl. Dealing with backs of the bowls. I like to stamp textures or images stamp to backs of them, but not add color. It is very important to seal the bowls. Sculpey’s Gloss Glaze works great for sealing the bowls. Sealing clay projects helps to protect the ink and clay, makes it look lively and purposely finished.

Supplies

Imagine
Other
  • Polyform – Sculpey Souffle Clay – Sea Glass, Igloo, Canary, Cherry Pie
  • Polyform – Sculpey Essential Tool Kit
  • Polyform – Sculpey Gloss Glaze
  • Ceramic or Glass Bowls
  • Rubber Stamps
  • Ceramic tile, crafting glass, or Sculpey Work ‘n Bake Clay Mat
  • Hemp string
  • Exacto knife

Craft A Time To Celebrate Greeting Card

by Iris Rodriguez

Craft A Time To Celebrate Greeting Card with Walnut Ink and Metallic Gold Creative Medium

Time to get busy and celebrate with this clock themed card! I just love wordplay and puns, don’t you? I’m also fond of clocks. The background for this card was made using Java Walnut Ink. I find the dark matte finish of the Walnut ink to be a great contrast against the gold metallic clock images stenciled with Creative Medium. The rich wood colors in the background really make the gold colors stand out.

Skill: Intermediate
Time: 1 hour

Directions


Step 1

Spray the watercolor paper with water. Then spray on the Java Walnut Ink and use a brush to even out the color. Dry the paper.


Step 2

Stencil the smaller clock patterns with the Gold Metallic Creative Medium using a palette knife. Let the medium dry for about 20 mins. To test if it is dry, lightly touch a small area with your finger, if it’s soft to the touch, it’s still wet.


Step 3

Stencil a different, but larger clock pattern over the first stenciled clocks. Let the medium dry. For stencils with larger openings, use the Multi-Purpose Squeegee. Add the medium onto the Squeegee with the palette knife.


Step 4

Let the medium dry completely. For thicker or larger stenciled patterns, allow the card to dry for a longer time frame (no pun intended), approximately 45 minutes. Test to see if it’s dry before continuing.


Step 5

Stamp a sentiment onto cardstock paper and cut out. Darken the edges with VersaFine Vintage Sepia. Stamp the chipboard gear with Golden Glitz Delicata and emboss with the Clear Embossing Powder. Optional step, color in the outline of the larger clock with a fine black marker, this adds dimension. Assemble the card and add any finishing details you desire.

Supplies

Imagine
Other
  • Watercolor paper
  • Cardstock paper
  • Crafter’s Workshop – Clocks stencil 6 x 6 inches
  • Deco Art-Clocks stencil 12 x 12 inches
  • Creative Embellishments – Chipboard Gear 1.5 inches

Create a Vibrant Art Journal Page to Tell Your Story

by Iris Rodriguez

Create a Vibrant Art Journal Page to Tell Your Story

Have you ever been attracted a shape, a pattern, an image, a technique and you don’t know why? For me, it’s been Asemic writing and abstract figures. Asemic writing is a wordless form of writing. It makes words look real, but it’s not meant to be read. This is a perfect way to express that you can write your own story every day and that nothing is set in stone. Imagine’s irRESISTible Pico Embellisher is a very fine mark-making tool and a medium perfect for Asemic writing. See how I make this vibrant journal page.

Skill: Intermediate
Time: 1.5 hours

Directions


Step 1

Spray the watercolor paper with water. Then brush on the All-Purpose Ink in Rose Pink, and Tropical Lagoon. Also, Brush on Fireworks Shimmery Craft Spray in Dandelion. Do not blend or the colors will turn into a mud color. Rather color in separate areas. You can lightly blend the edges with a brush. Dry the paper.


Step 2

Use an InkBlushers to stencil in patterns with VersaFine Clair in Tulip Red, Monarch and Warm Breeze. You can use any stencil pattern you happen to have.


Step 3

To get a dimensional look, like you see on the top right of the of the image above, stencil the shape with a dark color, then place the stencil over the same area and slightly offset it, stencil a lighter color ink.


Step 4

The Dina Wakley stencil contains the positive and negative shapes. The cutout (positive) piece is considered a mask. Place the mask on the substrate. Make an outline with the VersaFine Clair in Nocturne using a Sponge Dauber.


Step 5

Continue to add to the shadows around the silhouette.


Step 6

Place a few drops of All-Purpose Ink in White onto your craft matt and pounce the Inkblusher into it and color inside the silhouette. This ink is opaque, so a couple of drops is more than enough. This will make the silhouette standout, while slightly making out the color and patterns underneath.


Step 7

Make Asemic writing marks inside the silhouette with the IrRESISTible Pico Embellisher in Tuxedo Black. It helps if you think of several parts of a phrase, song, poem and abstractedly and write it out.


Step 8

On a piece of white cardstock paper, stamp out a sentiment, then cut it out. Glue onto the page. Draw a frame with the black IrRESISTible Pico Embellisher for added interest.

Thank you! If you would like to learn more about stenciling then please see a full tutorial: Learn the Basics of Stenciling

Supplies

Imagine

Other

  • Watercolor paper
  • Crafter’s Workshop – Rebekah Meier stencil; Star and Flower
  • Dyan Reaveley’s Dylusions Arrows stencil
  • Dina Wakley Casey & Penelope stencil
  • Alphabet stamps

Learn the Basics of Stenciling

by Iris Rodriguez

Learn the Basics of Stenciling

Stencils are a great tool to use for creating images and effects on just about any creative project. You can decorate a  journal with them, create card backgrounds and textures, use in your paintings, or in home décor projects. Imagine’s inkpads, inks, sprays, and texture mediums can all be used with stencils. In addition, Imagine has you covered with applicators such as Sponge Daubers, Palette knives, and Stipple brushes. In this article, I’ll discuss some ways to organize, use with different products, proper care and cleaning your stencils.

Organizing Your Stencils

There many ways to organize your stencils. One excellent way is to search crafting, office and home goods stores for options on storage containers. Whichever you choose, it’s important to lay them flat. I think on of the best ways to keep them flat is to use dividers in storage bins or drawers. File folders can be found in office supply stores. Label your dividers by type, theme, or designer. Another way to store stencils in a three-ring binder book inside plastic page protectors. Place color cardstock paper so that you can see the stencil and maximize storage by storing two stencils on one sheet.

If you have an open crafting space then hang stencils with metal hook clips on a rack. I like the idea of hanging my stencils because I can easily go through them and find what I am looking for. I punch a hole in the corners of my stencils and place them in a binder ring.

I have an IKEA wooden shelving unit to store my crafting storage bins. I’ve attached long screws on the side to hang my stencils. Hanging them freed up space and I can easily access them. Some alternatives are to hang them on a clothes hanger with a metal hook or binder clips, store them flat in bins or drawer or hang them on revolving wire three-tier shoe rack with a metal hook or binder clips.

Stenciling with Imagine Inks

Imagine’s Inkblushers and Sponge Daubers work great with stencils because the soft sponge material presses ink down past the edges of the stencil’s details. The sponges produce sharp edges and finely detailed inking better than most other tool. If you have a highly detailed stencil, the sponge materials are especially handy for getting into small and intricate opening, or getting around the tight areas of the stencil.

Stenciling with All-Purpose Ink and Inkblushers. Add a couple of ink drops to your crafting mat and pounce the Inkblusher over the ink. Inkblushers are highly absorbent and work well with Imagine’s All-Purpose Inks.

Inkblushers can also be used to stencil with acrylic paints. Like with inks, you can get clean edges and good detail. Wash the Inkblusher under running water immediately. If you cannot get to the sink right away, wipe off as much paint as you can and then keep it in water, like your paintbrush water. If left out without being washed, the paint will dry and harden the Inkblusher. Unfortunately, the paint cannot be washed out. However, all is not lost; only the area that had the paint will harden, and not harden the entire sponge. Using your scissors, cut off the piece with the hardened paint and continue to use.

Imagine’s Jumbo Daubers provide fine detailed inking. The handle allows you to have great control and pressure over the stencils. Imagine’s Jumbo Daubers also work great Acrylic paints. Add a few drops of paint to your craft mat, pounce the Dauber on the paint, then pounce the Dauber onto a clean area on your mat. Get the paint evenly on the Dauber and avoid globs of paint. If you get too much paint on the Dauber, it will go under the stencil.

Imagine’s Creative Mediums are smooth acrylic pastes that provide yummy textures for any project. This is where stencils are very different from stamps because you can create an image with texture. Use Imagine’s palette knives and Squeegee to add the Creative Medium. Silver Metallic Creative Medium using a palette knife. Imagine’s Multi-purpose Squeegee has a wider surface; perfect for using with larger stencils with large openings. Use a palette knife to add the medium onto the Squeegee.

Imagine’s Fireworks Craft Spray makes stenciling a breeze. To get clean patterns, start spraying from the outside edges of the paper and spray inwards. Change up the starting point and spray. By starting from the outside, avoids harsh spray edges or heavy splotches of ink. Clean up is easy, simply wipe off your stencil and craft mat with a dry paper/cotton towel. To double down on the stencil effects you can “stamp” the wet ink from the stencil onto another piece of cardstock.

Create unique effects with Imagine Stipple brushes. These brushes have a flat, firm bristle head for stippling. It can be used on just about any surface. They are great for stenciling on fabric for getting into the grain. This creates patterns of fine dots by pouncing the brush onto the substrate. Scumble by brushing at a slight angle in a random fashion. This creates brushstrokes and because of brush’s firm bristles, it won’t get under the stencil.

Cleaning the Stencils

One of the hardest things about working with stencils is cleaning them. Even so, keeping your stencils clean will help to maintain clean edges, last longer and you’ll have a clean stencil for your next project. The key to success for keeping stencils clean, regardless of the medium, is to clean them immediately with a wet paper/cloth towel or baby wipe. Depending on the medium you will have ink/paint residue.

When using pigment inks, All-Purpose Ink, or dye inks, wipe the stencil immediately with a wet paper/cloth towel, or baby wipe. Since these inks are water-based the stencil will clean up quickly and completely. When using permanent inks, simply wiping the stencil off with water, will not get it clean. Use a stamp cleaner or Rubbing Alcohol to clean your stencil. Imagine’s StazOn All-Purpose Stamp Cleaner works well for cleaning ink off your stencils. Dab the cleaner on the stencil and wipe with a dry paper/cloth towel. The cleaner tends to leave a little bit of an oily residue. Simply wipe it off with a clean wet paper/cloth towel.

Acrylics paints are harder on stencils than inks. Acrylic paint can leave heavy buildup on your stencils and distort the edges. As with inks, clean the stencil immediately after using with a wet paper/cloth towel or baby wipe. Get as much paint off of it, as possible.

Use a cleaning or nail brush and soap to clean your stencils. Mix handwashing/dishwashing or Artist Painter’s type soap with water in a container. Dip the brush and scrub the paint off the stencil. Lay the stencil flat and rub gently, avoid bending the openings.

Sources

http://www.shellybailey.com/2014/03/project-life-2014-title-page-and.html

Source: https://www.sadieseasongoods.com/stencil-storage-magazine-rack/

Source: http://www.arthappy.me/paint-storage-display-idea/

Source: http://www.arthappy.me/paint-storage-display-idea/

Create an Industrial Mixed Media Look with Walnut Ink

by Iris Rodriguez

I like abstract art and assemblages in crafting! The mixed media style can be created with just about anything; inks, paints, found objects…there are no rules. For today’s tutorial, I wanted to create an abstract assemblage art combined with the vintage, grungy, industrial look using Imagine’s Walnut Ink.

Skill: Intermediate
Time: 1.5 hours

Directions


Step 1

Stamp the texture images with VersaMark ink on watercolor paper. Add Imagine’s Embossing Powder in White and heat set.


Step 2

Brush on the Eucalyptus Walnut Ink. Dry paper.


Step 3

Brush on the Walnut and Java Walnut Inks.


Step 4

Let the paper fully dry.


Step 5

Stamp more texture images with Spiced Chai StazOn ink.


Step 6

On a separate piece of watercolor paper stamp the round images with the VersaMark ink. Add Imagine’s Embossing Powder in White and heat set. Brush on Java or Walnut inks or a combination of both. Vary the colors on the circles. Dry paper. Cut out the circles.


Step 7

Color the gears and brads to make them all the same color with Chai Staz-On ink. Heat set the gears and brads if you’d like to speed up the dry time.


Step 8

Attach the gears to the circles with the brad. Place the circles in the desired area on the background paper. Do not glue the circles yet. It’s easier to bend and wrap the wire if the circles are not glued down. Wire wrap around each gear and brads, ensuring that the wire goes under the gear. Do not let the wire press down on the circles, it will bend the paper.


Step 9

Turn the circles upside down, add glue to the back of the circle and onto a piece scrap piece of chipboard.


Step 10

Adhere the chipboard pieces on top of the brad’s backing. This will secure brads and gears and give the circles dimension by giving them a little height. Glue the circles onto the background. Add dark brown backing and you’re done.

Thank you for stopping by the Imagine blog! I hope you give this abstract art project a try.

Supplies

Imagine
Other
  • Impression Obsession stamps – Seth Apter Edges, Planetarium
  • Watercolor paper
  • 20 gauge steel wire
  • Metal Gears
  • Brads
  • Chipboard
  • Brush