Learn How to Create Wedding Ring Clay Bowls

by Iris Rodriguez

Learn How to Create Wedding Ring Clay Bowls and color with All purpose ink in rose gold

Spring is here, the weather is getting nicer and the wedding season is upon us. One of the smallest details that has the biggest meaning in a wedding, is the ring. In this post, I will demonstrate how to make two different DIY ring bowls using air dry clay and All-Purpose inks. Using Imagine’s newest stunning Rose Gold All-Purpose ink, I demonstrate how to make a Rose Gold flower ring bowl. I will also show you how to add shading and depth by making use of the All-Purpose ink Vintage Wine, a dark burgundy color.

Skill: Intermediate
Time: 1 Hour to make the bowls, 2 days total for bowls to air dry

Directions


Step 1

For this project, I used Activa Plus clay. This clay is fine, moist, malleable, firm, but not hard. It is an air dry clay. Keep the clay moist by spraying a little water. Adding water also makes it softer. When the clay is wet, it is beige like color, and when dry it turns off white color. The rate that it dries will depend on the thickness of the project and room temperature. The drier the room, the faster it dries.


Step 2

Roll out a sheet of clay. You can use a roller normally used roll out dough or use a clay roller.


Step 3

The clay is usually very smooth when it’s rolled out. If it is not, then smooth out the clay with your fingers, rib tool or wet sponge.


Step 4

Using a stylus, draw out the desired shape. Use can also a template or other items you can place over the clay and trace. If you change your mind, remove the line by smoothing out the clay.


Step 5

Using a clay needle tool or knife, cut out the shape.


Step 6

Smooth out the edges with your fingers or tools. Draw the petal’s ridges with a hard-edged tool. Sculpt the stamen by using a stylus or the pointy end of a paintbrush.


Step 7

Place the clay bowl into a real bowl or other object and allow it dry for one to two days. It will take on the shape of the object. To determine if it’s dry, take a look at the natural clay color; it will turn an off-white when dry. Also, if the clay feels cold then it’s still wet.


Step 8

Paint the clay with the Vintage Wine All-Purpose ink with a paint brush. Heat set the ink with a heating tool or allow the ink to air dry more than half hour. Allow the ink to dry completely before proceeding.


Step 9

Using the Inkblusher, sponge on the Rose Gold All-Purpose ink. Tap gently in an up and down motion, ensuring that it does not get into recessed areas. Heat set the ink with a heating tool or allow the ink to dry for about 10 minutes. Because it is sponged on, the ink dries fairly quickly. The color intensity will be determined by the number of layers used. I used four thin layers for my bowls. Allow each layer to dry before proceeding.


Step 10

Following steps 2-6 to make the heart shaped bowl. For this bowl, I made heart templates out of cardstock paper and added the texture by making indentations with a clay stylus tool or you can use the pointy end of a paintbrush.


Step 11

Paint the heart bowl with Red Delicious All-Purpose ink. Heat set the ink with a heating tool or allow the ink to dry for more than a half hour.


Step 12

Paint one layer of the Vintage Wine All-Purpose ink.


Step 13

Wipe off the ink from the raised areas with a baby wipe or cotton cloth. Do not use a paper towel. It will stick to the clay and ink, as they are porous surfaces. It is very important to seal the bowls. It protects the ink and clay from liquids and dust. Best of all, it looks purposely finished. You can use a spray sealant like 3M/Krylon or brush on a water-based varnish or polyurethane.

Supplies

Imagine

Craft Mat
All-Purpose Ink – Vintage Wine, Rose Gold, Red Delicious

Other

• Activa Plus Self Hardening Clay – White
• Modeling clay tools
• Sealer (spray, or polyurethane)

Learn How To Create A Sgraffito Style Clay Bowls

by Iris Rodriguez

Learn How To Create A Sgraffito Style Clay Bowls and All Purpose Ink

Sgraffito (an Italian word meaning “to scratch”) is a decorating pottery technique produced by applying color to clay then scratching off parts of the clay when it is leather hard, creating contrasting images, patterns, and texture that reveal the clay color underneath. This technique has been around since around the 15th century. For this project, we’ll follow in the footsteps of potters in making sgraffito bowls (minus kilns or firing glazes). Instead, the bowls are made with store-bought air dry clay that is similar in texture and behavior as ceramic earthenware clay and Tsukineko’s All-Purpose Ink.

Skill: Intermediate
Time: 1 hour to make the bowls, 2 days total for bowls to air dry

Directions

For this project, I used Activa Plus clay. I like this clay because it’s similar and behaves like earthenware ceramics clay, ideal for sgrafitto. This clay is fine, moist, malleable, firm, but not hard.
Step 1

First, let’s talk clay. For this project, I used Activa Plus clay. I like this clay because it’s similar and behaves like earthenware ceramics clay, ideal for sgrafitto. This clay is fine, moist, malleable, firm, but not hard. Keep it moist by spraying a little water. Adding water also makes it softer. When the clay is wet, it is beige like color, and when dry it turns off white color. Imagine’s All-Purpose ink is ideal because it’s a lightweight, but highly pigmented ink and the clay is porous, which, allows the ink to seep through. It clay air dries. The rate that it dries will depend on the thickness of the project and room temperature. The drier the room, the faster it dries.

You can use a roller used roll out dough or use a clay roller.
Step 2

Roll out a sheet of clay. You can use a roller used roll out dough or use a clay roller.


Step 3

The clay is usually very smooth when it’s rolled out. If it is not, then smooth out the clay with your fingers, clay scraper or wet sponge.


Step 4

Using a stylus, draw out the desired shape. Use a template or other item you can place over the clay and trace. If you change mind, remove the line by smoothing out the clay.


Step 5

Using a clay needle tool or knife, cut out the shape. Smooth out the edges with your fingers. Also cut out a small piece of clay, as a test sample.


Step 6

Using a stylus, lightly draw your images. If you change your mind, erase it, by smoothing out the clay.

Paint the clay with the Thyme All-Purpose ink
Step 7

Paint the clay with the Thyme All-Purpose ink. Use a soft brush, so that you don’t get brush strokes. Also, paint the clay sample. I like painting the clay while it’s wet, because this clay is very porous, the paint seeps in nicely into the clay.

Paint the clay with the Thyme All-Purpose ink
Step 8

Place the clay bowl into a real bowl or other object and allow it dry. It will take on the shape of the object. Let dry for 8-12 hours, but no more than 12 hours. The rate of dryness will vary on humidity and dryness. The drier the room or if placed in the sun, the faster it dries. Test your sample clay by carving into it. If you can carve without the clay distorting or dragging; the shaving is coming off cleanly, then you are ready to carve.


Step 9

Carve out the image that you drew earlier with clay carving tools or carving tools used to carve rubber stamps. I tried both and found both works well. Do not wipe off the clay crumbs with your fingers, only wipe off with a dry, clean paintbrush. This prevents from accidentally distorting the clay, or break off unwanted pieces of clay.


Step 10

After carving the images, allow the bowls to dry for another full day. Test by looking at the natural clay color; it will turn an off-white when dry. Also, if the clay feels cold then it’s still wet. It’s important to seal the bowls with spray sealers, or brush on sealers like polyurethane. The sealer protects the ink and clay from liquids, dust or other particles and looks nice and finished.

Supplies

Imagine
Other
  • Activa Plus Self Hardening Clay – White
  • Clay carving tools or rubber stamp carving tools
  • Sealer (spray, or polyurethane)